Tag Archives: Organic

Computational Design workshops 2013 at Dark

Arne Folkestad Bjelland

Arne Folkestad Bjelland

One of the things I really wanted to do when I started my current position as Digital Design Manager at Dark was to try to generate some interest around computational design. I’m absolutely no computational nor design expert, but I have some interest when it comes to conceptual modeling tools, math and visual programming, and as with many things in life; when you like something you stick with it.

We put together 6 workshops, most of them with different attendees. This meant we spent some time on introductions to the concepts and tools available each time we met. Still, I was very impressed by the work that we managed to produce during the 3 hours these workshops lasted.

I normally divide the workshops in three parts; during the first hour I show something I believe will be new to the present attendees, the second hour everyone model something from their imagination – totally without creative constraints or guidelines, but before we start I announce that during the last hour every participant must present their work to the others. That has a tendency to up the prestige slightly. I guess I never actually mentioned that their work would also be published online…

We’ve mostly used Autodesk Vasari during these sessions. Unfortunately we haven’t been able to spend much time on visual programming and Dynamo yet, but this is something I hope we can dive into at the start of 2014. I’m sure Zach Kron will recognize some of the patterns in our exercises, as we’ve used his YouTube on several occasions. I bow in honor.

While these interactive training sessions are mainly for Dark employees we have at times invited certain individuals from other companies and educational institutions. If you’d like to be invited to these workshops, please let me know and perhaps we can make it happen. They will also most likely be published in the Events section on Relinquish.

Here is a sober selection of the creative work we produced during some of these very inspirational workshops:

Arne Folkestad Bjelland

Arne Folkestad Bjelland

Arne Folkestad Bjelland

Arne Folkestad Bjelland

René Damborg Jensen

René Damborg Jensen

René Damborg Jensen

René Damborg Jensen

René Damborg Jensen

René Damborg Jensen

Charlotte Hansson

Charlotte Hansson

Charlotte Hansson

Charlotte Hansson

Marin Kulas

Marin Kulas

Charlotte Hansson

Charlotte Hansson

Charlotte Hansson

Charlotte Hansson

Simona Ferrari

Simona Ferrari

Arne Folkestad Bjelland

Arne Folkestad Bjelland

Arne Folkestad Bjelland

Arne Folkestad Bjelland

Ida Stople

Ida Stople

Vilde Aspen

Vilde Aspen

Vilde Aspen

Vilde Aspen

Vilde Aspen

Vilde Aspen

Andreas Haukeland

Andreas Haukeland

Erik Ege

Erik Ege

Maya Målsnes

Maya Målsnes

Kjell Kristian Karlsen

Kjell Kristian Karlsen

Håvard Vasshaug

Håvard Vasshaug

Håvard Vasshaug

Håvard Vasshaug

Håvard Vasshaug

Håvard Vasshaug

Animated Tilted Surface Patterns in Revit

I’m afraid I’m starting to bore my readers with this repeated going on and on about Image-O-Matic and animated Mass families. For that I’m sorry, but I have yet another example of it’s potential use.

Some time back I saw a link on Twitter followed by some exchange of ideas between some people I follow. The link was to artist Ned Kahn’s webpage and work, and the discussion basically evaluated different possibilities for this kind of thing to be modeled and visualized in Revit. As I remember, one of the proposals during the discussion that followed was: *Surprise* Image-O-Matic!

Take a look: nedkahn.com/portfolio/wind-veil

Of course I immediately had to scrape the idea of making identical stuff in Revit, with multiple waves and large surfaces, and confine it to mere inspiration.

I produced two models, one vertical facade and one horizontal ceiling above a pool “sort of thing”. The first video was a prototype and the second is the finished product of the vertical surface.

Details from the Adaptive Component family:

Tilted pattern horizontal AC

This is basically a simple disc, hosted on a Reference Line that tilts according to an angle that in turn increases when the Adaptive Placement Point number 2 gets closer. This is done with a simple tan-function.

2013-06-10 20-24-19

The second Reference Point gets hosted on a Reference Line, and the position of the point on that line is associated with a Number Parameter that is used for animation.

2013-06-11 08-31-43

Here is the Mass family and parameters:
Tilted pattern horizontal rotation2013-06-10 20-22-31

The point that controls the displacement in the Mass family is hosted to the end of a Reference Line, that is in turn rotated around the Mass center.

2013-06-11 08-40-17

The last animation of the vertical facade took about a day to make, with approximately 200 HD images being generated and assembled. And yet it is too short, as the Reference Point moves far too fast because of the long hosting Reference Line. Also I’m not totally loving the robotic presence the symmetrical layout and movement makes.

Tilted pattern horizontal pool 1

The “surface above pool” model is nice, although also very robotic. Here, the Reference Point moves on a circular path around the pattern’s center. I’ve also put in a variable that uses a sine function to control the amount of angular displacement.

I could probably make this easier by just tilting the disc towards the second Reference Point, and do more work on the Reference Line defining the path (give it a height for instance), but that would ruin my math and hence my day.

Ironically I like the first (prototype) animation best. That’s probably because the Reference Point moves slow, and on a fairly organic path. Too bad I didn’t make it HD or save a backup. And what do we learn from this? Never neglect your first work.

Tilted pattern horizontal pool 2

Download the Mass family used above the pool: Tilted pattern horizontal rotation

Training

Path reinforcement

 

Tonight I added a new section to my website: Training.

I mean to provide Revit training to whoever wishes to learn about using Revit to the best of it’s abilities, and I look to make this website section the portal for pre and post training information and content.

For the future I plan to offer all kinds of customized training, be it project workshops, general topics or just fun stuff. To get started somewhere, the first available published training session is Revit as a Tool for Modeling Concrete Reinforcement. This is an extended version of my 90 minute class SE4240 (with the same name) from Autodesk University 2012. As you can see, I also plan to make available organic modeling curriculum based on my computational design studies from the past six months.

If you are interested in contacting me about Revit training, or know someone who are, please do not hesitate to do so through the contact form in the Me section.