Tag Archives: Education

Andreas, Julien and me at RTCEUR 2014 in Dublin

Dynamo in Oslo and Copenhagen

“What is the coolest possible thing we can do?”

Lars Robertsen at Autodesk asked me that question two months ago. I responded “Well that would be having Julien Benoit, Andreas Dieckmann, Matt Jezyk and Dieter Vermeulen come to Norway to show of amazing Dynamo material.” I have to admit that Zach Kron was on that list as well, but I´m sure Matt will do just fine without the Barry White of BIM at his side.

My friends are coming to meet you. Seats are limited, so hurry up. If you are using Revit, you need to learn Dynamo. It´s as simple as that. And you will struggle to find a better lineup of people to teach you. This is the A Team. (Sorry for the lack of humbleness. I have decided to stop using that for a while.)

The events are all free, and are the results of a collaborative effort between Dark Architects, Snøhetta, Autodesk, C.F. Møller and Multiconsult. It´s a beautiful thing when people just get together and teach each other stuff.

Register:

Copenhagen August 26 Event

Oslo August 27 Event

Thanks to Julien, Andy, Matt and Dieter for coming, Cathrine Mørch for hosting, Jill Nilsson for organizing and Lars for asking an awesome question. See you all there!

Learn Revit

2015-07-26_14-33-45

“Can you make a basic Revit video tutorial series for me”, Rodrigo asked.

“Of course.”

I did. It’s out. You can listen to my ranting at thinkparametric.com/courses/revit-architecture-101

Margarida Jeronimo Barbosa at Dark helped me so much making this course that I’m embarrassed to admit it. Great work. Thank you<3

I also owe big thanks to the team at Dark and Zinc who I worked with on this project: Jeanette Norin, Caroline Stokkebokjær Hjelseth, Kaja Kittang Kvande, Christine Grape and Ida Stople. I wrote about the project in the blog post A White Sheet.

The main reason I wanted to help Rodrigo and his friends at Think Parametric is I really like their Rhino and Grasshopper courses. I’ve also come to find many interesting design workflows integrating the four programs Revit, Dynamo, Rhino and Grasshopper. I believe Think Parametric’s computational exercises combined with building information modeling knowledge offers many interesting building design solutions.

At RTCAUS I used several examples of moving data between these four programs and letting each of them use their own strengths. I plan on doing more of the same at RTCEUR. And who knows; maybe one day you’ll find a video tutorial on the same topic at Think Parametric?

11075285_10155363477290008_8126742379702751608_n

Dynamo student submissions

One of the coolest things I did so far this year was teaching Dynamo to engineering students at Bergen University College. I used the same exercise that I taught world leading digital design specialists at Autodesk University in Las Vegas late in 2014: The atrium roof of the Smithsonian Museum of American Arts in Washington DC, that Zach Kron helped me develop. I really like that design example, and was thrilled that many of the 68 students managed to follow. Which is rather spectacular, as none of them had ever heard of visual programming before, and few were proficient Revit users.
After a day of lecturing the students received an assignment that they would solve themselves. Although the assignment was vague and similar to the lecture material, I impressed by the creativity and skills shown by a majority of the students.
Here, I present the 3 submissions that my co-teacher Magne Ganz and me thought were exceptional:

Robert Gravdal

This shell construction based on a combination of cosine functions is my tribute to the beautiful mountain called «Norskehesten» (The Norwegian Horse), which in my opinion is best viewed at sunset, from my favorite fishing spot, in my hometown called Hyllestad 🙂
One interesting thing about “Norskehesten” is that it has a peculiar quality of looking quite similar from different orientations.
I see many opportunities for my design. Maybe it is a roof over an atrium (preferably square), or it is a sculpture, or maybe it is a stand-alone building, only missing some walls.
Maybe/hopefully, I get to realize it some day! 🙂

Robert_Gravdal

 

Aleksander Jørgensen

Roof structure based on cosine functions with half periods.

Aleksander Jørgensen H141405

 

Camilla Flataukan

Camilla.Flataukan PDF_Page_1Camilla.Flataukan PDF_Page_2Camilla.Flataukan PDF_Page_3Camilla.Flataukan PDF_Page_4Camilla.Flataukan PDF_Page_5

Smithsonian collage

Dynamo Video Tutorials

How do you learn to play the piano?

You learn the basics, find a YouTube instructor, and practice a melody that you like. That’s how I do it anyway. How do you learn computer software? You learn the basics, and find a problem that you love solving. That’s how my son learnt how to ski. It has to be fun. And now I play Bach. Because I think its awesome.

I recently hosted a whole day Dynamo lab for engineering students at Bergen University College. The curriculum that I used was a developed version of material I presented in 2014 with Julien Benoit at RTCEUR, and solo at Autodesk University (AU) 2014; Computational Logic in Structural Design. The math and script was developed last summer, with much help from Zach Kron.

The structure was inspired by a question I got from a colleague during a Computational Design workshop at Dark: “Dude, have you seen the Smithsonian”? Voilà; I had a problem that I loved to solve. Now, 64 students in Bergen have learnt how to mathematically model the roof of the Smithsonian American Art Museum atrium roof in Washington DC.

After AU I expanded the example with more Structural Framing diagonals, analytical model information and Robot integration. Instead of writing new or revising documents to supplement the live labs, I decided to record short and fast video tutorials and post the on YouTube.

The students are now using these tutorials to learn Dynamo with my Smithsonian roof problem, and so can you:

Here’s the handout I wrote for AU: Computational Logic in Structural Design

In the future I hope to expand the curriculum further by applying more analytical data (Loads, Load Combinations, Boundary Conditions, Calculations, Results Management, Analytical Visualization, and so on) and perhaps genetic algorithm optimization techniques (Galapagos, Optimo). I’d be very interested to hear if you have ideas to ways this problem, and it’s solutions, could be enhanced.

Last, I gave my students an assignment. Go ahead if you want, and see if your skills and imagination can challenge theirs:

Create a Dynamo script that generates a roof of steel beams based on a trigonometric function. The example below is based on a sine curve between 0 and 180 degrees. The structure must be parametric in length, width, height and grid. Present the results in an inventive way.

Assignment